Congratulations to Jo Pavey For Winning Sports Personality Of The Year By Default.

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9 Responses

  1. Bob says:

    hilariously terrible article, full of straw man arguments and lack of knowledge.

    I am by no means an avid F1 fan but even I know they require a huge level of fitness. This may help you understand a little bit http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/motorsport/formula_one/6980337.stm

    So you can see how it’s not the speed of the car or the ‘perceived levels of difficulty’ that make F1 a sport. It’s a sport because it’s a competitive athletic activity.

  2. Matt says:

    Bob,

    The cars isn’t a sport.

    Thanks,
    Matt

  3. Simon says:

    F1 is a sport, however only a Mercedes driver could win the title and Rosberg had shown himself to be an average driver at best over the years. Hamilton although good is by no means the best driver on the grid and not even in the top 3 IMO
    The biggest travesty of SPOTY is that the best, bravest athlete, who won the toughest league in the world whilst playing with a fractured cheekbone and eye socket which occurred in the first ten seconds of the match, and still was the first Englishman ever to win the MOM in said final, who was voted international player of the year, didn’t even get nominated.
    Go on You Tube, type in “Slammin Sam” and then after watching what this guy went through to become the best player either code if tugby has ever seen, tell me he isn’t the biggest personality in sport

    • Matt says:

      He’s that big a personality, I’ve no clue who you’re on about..?
      Surely a pre-requisite to be nominated as SPOTY is to a) be at the top of your game (a tick in the box for all who were nominated, and your fella I’m sure); and, b) For people outside the sport to know who you are so you can get votes.

      The article was vering on the pointless anyway, not even remotely factual, just someone having a giggle by way of a rant. No point in you getting your knickers in a twist either.
      I wanted Jo Pavey to win too, knew she’d never win because of the nature of the competition, and am no more vexed than I was before the result now that she ‘only made the podium’.

  4. Nick says:

    The key word is the ‘P’ – personality. It is not sportsman or sportswoman of the year, it is sports personality of the year. It’s a popularity contest. And sadly there are more people who watch F1 than watch athletics.

    Then again, I would argue that Hamilton is a humourless robot devoid of personality. So that means McIlroy wins.

  5. TWBrit says:

    It is a sport, I have no doubt about that, and to deal with the heat and G-forces is incredible. That said… The driving bit, not so much.
    My personal issue – is Hamilton has no personality at all, hint’s at racism when things don’t go his way and is paid possibly too much (not that I’d complain about a thing if I earned that dosh)
    Other than that, while I don’t participate in any sport – I would prefer the award to go to someone who has to physically work out all day every day and know the true pain of exhaustion 7 days a week
    and would probably be Jo šŸ™‚

  6. Paul says:

    None of them are sports, they are games and activities… Hunting, fishing and horse related activities are Sports.

  7. Disappointed that none of our international egg throwers were nominated

  8. Adrian fox-kirk says:

    The definition of the word sport is:- an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment. By that definition, F1 and golf are both sports. Added to that, the fact that cars don’t drive themselves. You do, using skill. The F1 guys are supremely fit due to the stresses put on their bodies during each and every race. The skill required to drive a car at 200mph and around corners is the reason why you can’t do it. Same with golf. Skill, strength etc are al required to be the best in what they do. All three are valid as sports, all require skill and strength to be the best, whereas, it is clear that there is no skill required to write badly, and still be published.

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